With the return of Granite State Schools in person, the primary distance learning option is returning to the state’s virtual charter school, but this school is struggling to keep pace with enrollment. Steve Kossakoski, CEO of the Virtual Learning Academy, or VLACS, is grateful for the technical issues and delays in returning to families, but he asks for patience. Since New Hampshire schools are now fully face-to-face, most districts recommend VLACS as a distance option. But some parents who are trying to enroll their students are having problems. A mother said she had been waiting for three weeks. “I sent out two support tickets,” said mother Beth Paiva. “I called five times, and most of them lasted over an hour before they got disconnected.” “I really apologize to everyone who tries to reach us,” Kossakoski said. The CEO said that even though the school works with an average of 12,000 students during the year, a sudden 48% increase in enrollment is too difficult to track. to 7,300 in a very short time, ”he said. The increase comes as VLACS updates its technology infrastructure. “About a year and a half ago, we started updating our student information system, and in the spring we selected a new learning management system,” Kossakoski said. “We were hoping everything would work out pretty well by the end of August, and we just need more time.” Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut has said he has confidence in VLACS. “We have seen them throughout the pandemic really intensify and provide exceptional educational opportunities for so many students throughout, and I have no doubt that they will be able to continue this level of service in the future,” Edelblut said Kossakowski said the school has hired additional staff who work long hours, but it could be another two to three weeks before things run efficiently.

With the return of Granite State Schools in person, the primary distance learning option is returning to the state’s virtual charter school, but this school is struggling to keep pace with enrollment.

Steve Kossakoski, CEO of the Virtual Learning Academy, or VLACS, recognizes the technical issues and delays in returning to families, but he asks for patience.

Because New Hampshire schools are now completely in-person, most districts recommend VLACS as a distance option. But some parents who are trying to enroll their students are having problems. A mother said she had been waiting for three weeks.

“I sent out two support tickets,” said mother Beth Paiva. “I called five times, and most of them lasted over an hour before they got disconnected.”

“I really apologize to everyone who tries to reach us,” Kossakoski said.

The CEO said that even though the school works with an average of 12,000 students during the year, a sudden 48% increase in enrollment is too difficult to follow.

“We’ve seen 2,383 more children from August 20 until now, so we’ve gone from just over 4,900 to 7,300 in a very short time,” he said.

The surge comes as VLACS updates its technology infrastructure.

“About a year and a half ago, we started updating our student information system, and in the spring we selected a new learning management system,” Kossakoski said. “We were hoping everything would work out pretty well by the end of August, and we just need more time.”

Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut has said he has confidence in VLACS.

“We have seen them throughout the pandemic intensify and provide exceptional educational opportunities for so many students, and I have no doubt that they will be able to continue this level of service in the future,” said Edelblut.

Kossakowski said the school has hired additional staff who work long hours, but it could take another two to three weeks before things run smoothly.


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