Virtual school trip of Blaenavon students to a Victorian classroom

WITH the coronavirus pandemic limiting any school plans to take children on school trips, could exploration be virtually the future?

Pupils from Blaenavon Heritage VC Primary School took the plunge to visit the city’s World Heritage Center via a virtual tour.

The students donned their Victorian-era attire and opened their laptops for their first school trip in 15 months.

Young people explored a 300-year-old classroom and explored the World Heritage Center – with interactive quizzes popping up on Blaenavon’s history.

While not quite the same as leaving the classroom, the children were excited to explore the World Heritage Site, where they learned to live and work in Blaenavon through a Victorian lesson on square.

Hannah, a grade 6 student, said: “It was really cool to be able to look around the site from our classroom, or even at home.

“My favorite part was the Victorian lesson with the creepy teacher, it really feels like we’re back in the good old days.”

virtual school trip to the city’s World Heritage Center.” alt=”Free Press Series: Pupils from Blaenavon Heritage VC Primary School on their virtual school trip to the city’s World Heritage Center.” class=”editor-image”/>Pupils from Blaenavon Heritage VC Primary School on their virtual school trip to the city’s World Heritage Center.

Blaenavon Heritage VC Elementary School Principal Jane Howells said: “We really appreciate the community and the rich heritage of Blaenavon, and it is important to develop an awareness of our position in the world.

“A key part of learning is fun, engagement, and setting up experiences that students remember. It’s a great way to make learning last.

virtual school trip.” alt=”Free News Series: Students dressed in Victorian-era clothing on their virtual school trip.” class=”editor-image”/>Students dressed in Victorian-era clothing on their virtual school trip.

Funded by the Welsh Government Cultural Recovery Fund, the World Heritage Center Virtual Tour allows schools to experience the industrial landscape of South Wales, which played an important role in the production of iron and coal in the 19th century.

The experience will also help people with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism plan and prepare for in-person visits, helping to make the center more accessible.

Torfaen’s Executive Board Member for Economy, Skills and Regeneration, Cllr Joanne Gauden, said: “It has been fantastic to connect local pupils to the heritage of South Wales which has played a crucial role. in the onset of the industrial revolution and really shaped the world we live in. today.

“We look forward to welcoming the students back to the World Heritage site in person, but this resource is here to stay. It’s a great way for people to experience Wales’ industrial past, wherever they are in the world and from the comfort of their own homes or classrooms.


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Perry A. Thomasson